Saturday, 15 May 2010

The Cork Stone, Derbyshire

The Cork Stone, Stanton Moor

The strangely shaped Cork Stone on Stanton Moor is about 5m high and apparently a natural outcrop. Iron handholds have been added to make it easier to climb.

In 1789 Major Hayman Rooke recorded four standing stones surrounding the Cork Stone, but these have long since disappeared.

16 comments:

FishHawk said...

I wonder why it is called the Cork Stone. For it looks like the profile of a person's head (with them looking to the left) from that angle to me.

sandy said...

Interesting, but I would agree poorly named, looks like a cupcake to me.

Sandy

The Ancient Digger said...

Wow, what an odd geological formation. There is a story behind this indeed.

Øyvind said...

I had to read about this area after seeing this, awesome area. I'm glad the area is protected. Do you have photos of the heart stone or is it overgrown now?

Øyvind said...

Btw its so awesome thinking about this being an important area in the bronze age and I find it ironic that the soil is so rich on podzols which steals iron and aluminium from the upper layers of the soil. :)

Poetic Shutterbug said...

Pretty interesting, now where's that wine bottle? It does however almost look like a mushroom. I would love to know the entire story behind this as well. Very cool

John | English Wilderness said...

Unfortunately I missed the Heart Stone and the Cat Stone. Hopefully I'll have chance to visit again at some point.

There are dozens of bronze age sites in this small area. It's a fantastic place to explore :-)

Sandra Rose Hughes said...

How neat to have such ancient things in your country. Thank you for sharing them with us. I hereby bestow on your the Prolific Blogger Award. To participate, visit my blog at www.mymotherthinksimagoodwriter.blogspot.com

earthtoholly said...

I think these mysterious structures are so interesting...like, what happened to the stones surrounding it? Some of the fun is just wondering about the meanings (if any) of these marvels of nature.

Waterrose said...

That is a very cool rock. We just took a trip thru the canyonlands here and saw some amazing rock formations.

Ryan said...

It would be good to do some investigating into the other stones that have disappeared but my guess would be that local farmers probably used them for building walls. thanks for visiting me John.

Sharkbytes said...

Now that is a weird rock. Of course the US has some too. I haven't featured Magnetic Rock from our MN hike last spring. Maybe I should!

William K Wallace said...

I truly hate climbing, but I would feel compelled to get to the top of that lump of rock to see what the view was like...

Emm said...

I love how the old handholds have weathered away at the bottom! Weathering and erosion were my favourite parts of geography at school.

Gerald (Hyde DP) said...

It reminds me a little of Brimham Rocks in Yorkshire - if you haven't been there I'd recommend a visit.

Benny said...

I agree with Fishhawk. Poorly named and looks like a person

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